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The Magic of Orangeries

This March, we reconstructed a 19th century French Orangerie in our showroom.  We have always been captivated by these classic structures with their tall, arching windows and romantic garden feel.

Aside from housing citrus trees during harsh European winters, orangeries were fashionable places to entertain guests. This theme prevails today, with modern day orangeries being used as eating, lounging, musing, and contemplating spaces.

Take, for example, the beguiling orangerie of Axel Vervoordt, the renowned antiques dealer and interior designer from Belgium.  Located at Vervoordt’s 14th century castle, Gravenwezel, this time worn structure is updated with precisely placed modern art and simple, linen upholstery.

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Vervoordt’s designs marry the comforts of indoor living while bringing the outdoors, in. Notice the planters and lush greenery in this living area.

Below, date palms, agaves, and yuccas sun themselves outside of a neo-classical orangerie, complete with a stone grotesque by Spigo Toscano.

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The following orangerie, from an unidentified chateau in France, allows natural light to gently cascade across colored-cement tile floors.

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Here we see graceful arched windows complemented by a simple stone buget wall and an eclectic collection of jarre d’anduze planters:

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Again we see jarre d’anduze, combined with a wood-planked ceiling and a dirt floor that maintain a rustic ambiance:

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Below, a stunning stone orangerie we imported from France. Designer Pam Pierce had a unique vision and helped turn the set of window surrounds and flooring into a stunning pool house for a client:

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Similar to orangeries, and often smaller in size, greenhouses are also used to keep greenery protected from harsh weather. Our proprietor, Ruth Gay, built a modest greenhouse in her backyard. Here it is, styled by Pam Pierce for Veranda magazine:

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Have we inspired you? See our latest email blast for more information on the 19th century orangerie currently à vendre at Chateau Domingue. Contact us here if you want to join our mailing list!

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